This website is intended for healthcare professionals
Subscriber log in
Trial log in
  

The impact of skin-to-skin contact at birth on breastfeeding


Marie Rivett

Second year Student Midwife, University of Worcester with a background in infant feeding

2017;20(6): ePub 29 May 2017

 

 (June 2017)



Read more...

Community management of lactational mastitis and/or breast abscess: a retrospective audit


Hillary Hu

Senior Resident Medical Officer at Westmead Hospital, New South Wales

Marisa Martin

Staff Specialist in Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Westmead Hospital, New South Wales

Hayley Diplock

Research Midwife at Westmead Hospital, New South Wales

Gwen Moody

Midwife at Westmead Hospital, New South Wales

TPM 2017;20(4):21-24

 (April 2017)


Lactational mastitis has an incidence of around 10 per cent in postpartum women, with breast abscess complicating some of these. The key principles of treatment include: supportive counselling, warm or cold compresses, effective milk removal, oral antibiotic therapy and symptomatic treatment. Patients can be managed in the community setting; however many present to hospital. The aim of this research was to establish which areas of clinical practice can be improved to reduce hospital admission rates. Sequential cases of lactation mastitis or breast abscess admitted to hospital over two years were reviewed, and it was found that the majority of patients attending the emergency department for management self-presented. There were low rates of utilisation of available community resources. There was poor patient knowledge of the natural history and simple management strategies for the condition. Midwives can play a vital role in educating new mothers and providing advice and support for non-pharmacological therapies.
Read more...

Breast milk provides life-long health protection


Lisa Bryant

11th International breastfeeding and lactation symposium 2016

Berlin, 22 April 2016

 (December 2016)



Read more...

Human milk: medicine for premature babies


Sioned Hilton

Education manager at Medela UK.

 (June 2016)


Following years of research there have been some significant developments in the understanding and subsequent support being offered to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) families. In addition, ground breaking advances in the treatment of premature infants, with specific interest in the role of human milk, are now available. New information was presented by leading international researcher, Professor Meier, at the 2011 International Breastfeeding and Lactation Symposium. This article seeks to share this insightful information and provide support to those working in or around the NICU.
Read more...

Breast milk breaks new boundaries


Sioned Hilton

Lactation consultant, Medela UK

 (June 2016)


It is widely understood that breast milk is best for babies, but groundbreaking research continues to be conducted by the world’s leading researchers to ensure we have the most recent knowledge to help breastfeeding mothers and give health professionals up to date guidance. This article provides a report from the 2012 International Breastfeeding and Lactation Symposium, touching on some of the key findings that were presented. This year’s symposium revealed some exciting news for the breastfeeding world and here our reporter gives us a snap shot of the three most significant updates: further understanding of stem cells in breast milk, findings that have unlocked the power of human milk and insights into medication and breast milk.
Read more...

Breastfeeding and relationship building: turning evidence into practice


Francesca Entwistle

Professional advisor, Baby Friendly Initiative

 

 (June 2016)


It is a sign of good progress that health professionals are now encouraged to implement strategies to support women to breastfeed, and to deliver services that support women to build a close, loving relationship with their babies. But how do we ensure that these services are evidence-based and economically sound? The evidence-base of effectiveness for interventions to promote and support the initiation and continuation of breastfeeding is well established (Unicef 2013). Current evidence suggests that local service provision should comprise of an appropriate mix of breastfeeding services to reflect the diversity of local needs including implementation of the Unicef UK Baby Friendly Initiative across maternity, neonatal, health visiting and children’s centre services (National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) 2006). This article takes a practical approach for midwives applying theory to practice when deciding what interventions to employ to support women in their infant feeding and relationship building with their baby.
Read more...

Breastfeeding and diabetes: Part 1


Valerie Finigan

Consultant Midwife for infant feeding, Pennine Acute NHS Hospitals Trust

 

 (June 2016)


Diabetes is an increasingly common disease (Narayan et al 2003; Cowie et al 2006). The financial impact of managing this condition is rising (Hogan et al 2003). Diabetes is a syndrome with genetic and environmental influences that results in both insulin resistance and insufficient insulin production (Weyer et al 1999). Increasing evidence suggests that exclusive breastfeeding may have a significant impact on the prevention of diabetes in adult life (Young et al 2002). In the first of a two part article on the impact of maternal diabetes on babies, Valerie Finigan looks at why it is important to motivate mothers with diabetes to exclusively breastfeed their babies as directed by the Department of Health (DH) (2003). Breastfeeding will have a positive impact in halting the rising diabetic trend. In addition to the physiological benefits of breastfeeding, women with diabetes report that breastfeeding helps them to fulfil their need to feel ‘normal’ (Riordan 2005).
Read more...

Supporting young mothers who want to breastfeed


Phoebe Pallotti

Lecturer in maternal care at University of Leeds

 (April 2016)


This article is a discussion of some of the current knowledge on how to best support young mothers who wish to breastfeed. It includes practice points taken from Phoebe's own qualitative research on young mothers and infant feeding and also a discussion of the valuable work of other midwives and researchers on the subject. We know that breastfeeding can have significant benefits for mothers and their babies; we also know that young mothers, as a group, are less likely to breastfeed than other mothers. Breastfeeding is an emotional subject: it can be empowering and satisfying, but it can also be a time of emotional strain and negative feelings of guilt and failure. This article aims to increase the understanding of what young mothers may want and need from breastfeeding support.
Read more...

The neonatal nurse: Advocating for breastfeeding mothers


Colm Darby

Neonatal nurse in a neonatal intensive care unit

Sharon Nurse

Senior lecturer in Midwifery at Queen’s University Belfast

 (February 2016)


Accurate information and support from healthcare professionals as well as respect for parental choice are all factors which contribute to effective breastfeeding in the neonatal unit; with this in mind, Colm Darby and Sharon Nurse discuss the potential problems in expressing breast milk and the interventions which might be effective in avoiding them. Advocacy is an inherent part of neonatal nurses’ role whilst caring for sick, vulnerable babies. Colm Darby is a male neonatal nurse working in a predominantly female environment and passionately believes in supporting and advocating for mothers who want to provide breast milk for their babies. In this article, Colm uses Borton’s model of reflection to discuss how he acted as an effective advocate for such a mother.
Read more...

POLISH WOMEN'S EXPERIENCES OF BREASTFEEDING IN IRELAND


Marcelina Szafranska

Midwife at Coombe Women’s and Infants’ University Hospital, Dublin

Dr Louise Gallagher

Assistant professor at Trinity College, Dublin

 (January 2016)


Exclusive breastfeeding among Polish mothers at three-to-four months (38.6 per cent) is in keeping with the low rates of breastfeeding in Ireland overall (Begley et al 2008), and suggests that Polish women have begun to adopt the infant feeding practices of Irish women. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore the factors that influence Polish women's decisions to initiate and continue breastfeeding in Ireland. A descriptive qualitative approach was utilised to explore participants' perspectives of breastfeeding. Results showed that professional and family support are key to a successful breastfeeding experience for these mothers. Recommendations include further individualised support in order to meet the needs of Polish women breastfeeding in Ireland.
Read more...

Why women stop breastfeeding in the early days


Deborah Sharp

Infant feeding co-ordinator at Bedford Hospital NHS Trust

Francesca Entwistle

Professional advisor at Unicef BFI

 (October 2015)



Read more...

The 'art' of successful breastfeeding education 


Eleanor Healer

Tutor in midwifery and medical law at Swansea University

 (September 2015)


Breastfeeding education must motivate a complete workforce in such a way that staff are equipped with the fundamentals and extended skills to carry out their role as infant feeding gurus, throughout their career. To achieve this with any success, there is an intrinsic need to establish a total understanding of both the physiology and emotional importance which underlies the art of breastfeeding. Only when this is attained will passion and longevity for the ‘art’ be fully embraced and respected.
Read more...

Breastfeeding and relationship building: Turning evidence into practice


Francesca Entwistle

Professional advisor at the Baby Friendly Initiative

 (February 2015)


It is a sign of good progress that health professionals are now encouraged to implement strategies to support women to breastfeed, and to deliver services that support women to build a close, loving relationship with their babies. But how do we ensure that these services are evidence-based and economically sound? The evidence-base of effectiveness for interventions to promote and support the initiation and continuation of breastfeeding is well established (Unicef 2013). Current evidence suggests that local service provision should comprise of an appropriate mix of breastfeeding services to reflect the diversity of local needs including implementation of the Unicef UK Baby Friendly Initiative across maternity, neonatal, health visiting and children’s centre services (National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) 2006). This article takes a practical approach for midwives applying theory to practice when deciding what interventions to employ to support women in their infant feeding and relationship building with their baby.
Read more...

Encouraging breastfeeding: financial incentives


Heather Whitford

Lecturer in mother and infant research at the University of Dundee

Barbara Whelan

Research associate in public health

Patrice van Cleemput

Research fellow in public health

Katharine Thomas

Honorary professor of health services research

all at the University of Sheffield,

Mary Renfrew

Professor of mother and infant health at the University of Dundee

Mark Strong

Clinical senior lecturer in public health

Elaine Scott

Nourishing Start for Health (NOSH) study manager

Clare Relton

Senior research fellow in public health

all at the University of Sheffield

 (February 2015)


The NOSH (Nourishing Start for Health) three-phase research study is testing whether offering financial incentives for breastfeeding improves six-eight-week breastfeeding rates in low-rate areas. This article describes phase one development work, which aimed to explore views about practical aspects of the design of the scheme. Interviews and focus groups were held with women (n=38) and healthcare providers (n=53). Overall both preferred shopping vouchers over cash payments, with a total amount of £200-250 being considered a reasonable amount. There was concern that seeking proof of breastfeeding might impact negatively on women and the relationship with their healthcare providers. The most acceptable method to all was that women sign a statement that their baby was receiving breast milk: this was co-signed by a healthcare professional to confirm that they had discussed breastfeeding. These findings have informed the design of the financial incentive scheme being tested in the feasibility phase of the NOSH study
Read more...

Peer support: helping to influence cultural change


Mary Whitmore

Infant feeding coordinator Blackpool and North Lancashire, tutor and supervisor Scottish registered breastfeeding charity

 (February 2015)


Breastfeeding peer support schemes in Blackpool and Lancashire work closely with midwifery and other partners to offer additional support and encouragement to breastfeeding mothers. Employed and volunteer peer supporters deliver a systematic service in target areas delivering workshops to pregnant mothers, supporting new mothers in hospital, including in the neonatal units, in mothers’ homes and in groups at children’s centres. Working with health, children’s centres, public health and councils, the peer supporters were instrumental in Fleetwood town agreeing to always welcome breastfeeding. They worked with teachers, public health and infant feeding coordinators to deliver a month-long breastfeeding campaign at a local college and, working with health visitors, have engaged with grandmothers to find out how they feel they can help support new mothers. Skilled supervision is essential to ensuring peer supporters work safely and continue to develop their skills and knowledge. Volunteer coordinators play a key role in valuing and organising volunteers.
Read more...

Perspectives on tongue-tie


Rosemary Dodds

Senior policy adviser at NCT

Deborah Neiger

Independent midwife in Yorkshire

 (October 2014)


In light of the recent NCT petition to Health Minister Dr Dan Poulter MP to update guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of tongue-tied babies to avoid stress and difficulties feeding for babies and their families, discussion has been sparked amongst mothers, midwives, health visitors and breastfeeding counsellors as to how exactly services could be improved. Access to evidence-based, family-centred care is vital to address this potentially distressing condition. But are we too quick to jump in with a diagnosis that may ultimately be of no clinical significance? This article presents two professional perspectives on the issue and highlights the pertinent research available.
Read more...

Brilliant breastfeeding!


Sioned Hilton

Lactation consultant and education manager at a breastfeeding advisory company

 (October 2014)


The 9th lactation and breastfeeding symposium was hosted in Madrid, Spain in April 2014. This year the team also shared the information further afield, taking to Twitter to run live chats. This article reports on three discussions of interest to The Practising Midwife readers: what is regarded as ‘normal’ in terms of breastfeeding; human milk lipids and health outcomes; and considering the research into the lactating mammary gland.
Read more...

WHAT ABOUT NEXT TIME? A SERIES OF REFLECTIONS Well advised: a journey to breastfeeding success


Jude Davis

Community midwife and in a freestanding midwife-led birth centre in central London

 (September 2014)



Read more...

Working in collaboration to achieve UNICEF Baby Friendly accreditation


Anne Leyland

Lecturer in midwifery

Kathryn Bond

Lecturer in midwifery and admissions tutor

both at the University of Salford

 (July 2014)


Effective training and education of health professionals is required to ensure that women receive the best education, support and advice to breastfeed (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence [NICE] 2006). In England it has been recommended that purchasing authorities should incorporate UNICEF standards into their commissioning plans (NICE 2006), thereby embedding the evidence into mainstream health and social services. While many university programmes are underpinned by UNICEF standards, relatively few universities have achieved full accreditation in the UK (UNICEF 2009).
Read more...

BABY FRIENDLY NEWS The national infant feeding network


Francesca Entwistle

Professional advisor at UNICEF UK Baby Friendly Initiative and midwifery lecturer at the University of Hertfordshire

 (May 2014)



Read more...