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MIDWIFERY BASICS: PRECEPTORSHIP 7. Perineal suturing


Megan Blease

Preceptorship support midwife at East Lancashire NHS Trust

Kerry Taylor

Midwifery lecturer at University of Central Lancashire

 (April 2016)


Preceptorship is the 15th series of 'Midwifery basics' targeted at practising midwives. The aim of these articles is to provide information to raise awareness of the impact of the work of midwives on women's experience, and encourage midwives to seek further information through a series of activities relating to the topic. During the transition from student midwife, the newly qualified practitioner (NQM) is required to obtain experience of perineal suturing. With exposure varying from student to student and inconsistency in teaching methods between hospital trusts, the NQM can be left feeling apprehensive and unsupported to learn this skill. Suturing is a major and sometimes traumatic event for childbearing women, whose experience can vary greatly, depending upon many factors, including environment, skill of those suturing, effective analgesia and waiting times. In this penultimate article of the series, Megan Blease and Kerry Taylor address the current issues and provide learning hints and tips for NQMs learning and practising the skill.
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MIDWIFERY BASICS: PRECEPTORSHIP 6. Learning the skill of intravenous cannulation


Laura Taylor

Practice and development midwife at Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Kerry Taylor

Midwifery lecturer at University of Central Lancashire

 (March 2016)


Preceptorship is the 15th series of 'Midwifery basics' targeted at practising midwives. The aim of these articles is to provide information to raise awareness of the impact of the work of midwives on women's experience, and encourage midwives to seek further information through a series of activities relating to the topic. In this sixth article, Laura Taylor and Kerry Taylor look into intravenous cannulation, providing an insight into the skill and why it is necessary. This article offers a step-by-step approach and top tips for those who are new to this skill, to help them practise it safely, effectively and with confidence.
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Catherisation: best practice in bladder care


Megan Blease

Preceptorship support midwife at East Lancashire NHS Trust

 (March 2016)


Bladder care is an integral part of caring for a woman in labour and the immediate postpartum period (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) 2014a). To ensure effective bladder care, the skill of urinary catheterisation is often undertaken by a midwife and can be required in a variety of different situations. Catheterisation is a necessary intervention whether it is intermittent, indwelling, short term or, less often, long term. This article addresses the current recommended guidance, highlights best practice measures and provides useful hints and tips to support catheter care.
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