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Community Zone

Featured article

Supporting women with perineal trauma

Approximately 90 per cent of women in the UK who have a vaginal birth experience some degree of perineal trauma (Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists [RCOG] 2015). Recent studies have noted that perineal trauma and extensive perineal trauma rates are rising in developed countries (Dahlen et al 2015). For this reason, it is imperative that midwives and other health care professionals working within the maternity services are aware of how to support women who are at an increased risk of sustaining perineal trauma during birth. Many women experience postnatal mental health issues due to perineal trauma. These effects can have consequences on women’s everyday lives and implications for their families. With the complex physical and psychological effects of perineal trauma, it is important for midwives to be aware of these issues and know how to support women, linking with members of the multidisciplinary team when needed (Priddis et al 2012).  
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Featured eLearning module

Perineal trauma

Approximately 90 per cent of women in the UK who have a vaginal birth experience some degree of perineal trauma (Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) 2015a). With the rates of perineal trauma increasing in the UK, identification of women who are at increased risk, particularly of severe perineal trauma, remains a priority. The long-term consequences of extensive perineal trauma can affect a woman’s emotional health and quality of life (RCOG 2015a). Identification, treatment and advice following perineal trauma remain an important aspect of midwifery care.Read more

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1 February 2017Vol 20 • Number 2



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